Thursday, 24 March 2011

POLICE SERVICE COMMISSION - PSC PHONE NUMBER TO MONITORS POLICE CONDUCT


2011 GENERAL ELECTIONS

ANY MISCONDUCT OR EXEMPLARY
CONDUCT, PLEASE CALL   THE PSC
MONITORS ON THESE   NUMBERS:

State
Contact number
State
Contact Number
ABIA
0816 685 7489
KATSINA
0816 685 7567
ADAMAWA
0816 685 7700
KEBBI
0816 685 7506
AKWA IBOM
0816 685 7533
KOGI
0816 685 7501
ANAMBRA
0816 685 7650
KWARA
0816 685 7525
BAUCHI
0816 685 7636
LAGOS
0816 685 7516
0806 009 0816
BAYELSA
0816 685 7686
NASARAWA
0816 685 7617
BENUE
0816 685 7552
NIGER
0816 685 7535
BORNO
0816 685 7563
OGUN
0816 685 7524
CROSS RIVER
0816 685 7477
ONDO
0816 685 7677
DELTA
0816 685 7517
OSUN
0816 685 7536
EBONYI
0816 685 7653
OYO
0816 685 7544
EDO
0816 685 7586
PLATEAU
0806 009 0850
EKITI
0816 685 7538
RIVERS
0806 009 8096
0806 099 8432
ENUGU
0816 685 7682
SOKOTO
0806 009 8210
GOMBE
0816 685 7673
TARABA
0806 009 8409
IMO
0816 685 7590
YOBE
0806 009 8451
JIGAWA
0816 685 7632
ZAMFARA
0806 009 0810
KADUNA
0816 685 7607
ABUJA FCT
0806 009 8455
KANO
0816 685 7698
0806 009 8224










Published by CLEEN Foundation with support from the Open Society Initiative for West Africa 

Monday, 21 March 2011

Guidelines for the Conduct of Police Officers on Electoral Duty

POLICE SERVICE COMMISSION
Guidelines for the Conduct of Police Officers on Electoral Duty
Abridged version
 INTRODUCTION
Police officers on electoral duties have a responsibility of ensuring that peaceful conditions are maintained at the polling and counting centres during elections and that citizen’s exercise of their franchise is carried out without fear of coercion, intimidation, violence or manipulation. To effectively discharge these function, the observation of the following guidelines is compulsory for every police officer on duty.

1.       Alertness
Police officers on electoral duty must be prompt in responding to any form of incident which could escalate if not properly handled at the polling and counting centres. He or she must be alert in noticing and preventing incidents that could lead to disruption of voting and associated electoral processes.

2.       Approachability
The police officer on election duty needs to be approachable and accessible to the voters who might need his or her assistance. Election duties provide the NPF an invaluable opportunity to contribute towards the much needed peaceful transition from one civilian to another. By performing this function credibly, the men and women of the NPF also improve the image of the organization and their relationship with Nigerians.

3.       Professionalism
The police officer must be professional in his or her demeanor and personal appearance. Polling officials, the public, election monitors and observers forms opinions about the police on the basis of the officers actions, appearance, and comportment.

4.       Maintenance of  Impartiality
Every police officer on electoral duty must avoid fraternization with any political party in any way that could be interpreted as capable of compromising their impartiality police personnel must be equally fair, courteous, and if necessary, firm to all persons in his or vicinity of deployment, without concern for the party top which they belong, their political or other opinions, religious, ethnic groups, place of origin, gender, wealth or other status. Any evidence or indication that a police officer on electoral duty showed bias towards one political party or another in any form has the potential to undermine the integrity of the elections and will be investigated by the PSC,  with disciplinary action being taken where appropriate.

5.       Fairness
Elections are usually political charged. Public sensitivities are bound to be unusually high with different people supporting different parties. The way the police officer handles a situation is liable to be interpreted differently by people of different political persuasions. Police officers on election duties must always strive to be fair to all and to avoid conduct that could be seen as high-handed, unfair or politically motivated. An officer‘s action, if viewed as excessive or un-fair, could lead to election –related conflict. Each person who witnesses the response to a given situation forms an opinion of the officer, the agency that deployed him or her, and the elections. Above all, there are also persons on the lookout for any opportunity or excuse to cause trouble. Police officers must never provide such people with an excuse to generate hostilities and cause the elections in their duty station to fail.

6.       Use of force   
(a)            Every voter has a right to life, physical and psychological integrity.
(b)            It is unlawful for a police officer to use excessive force in dealing with voters.
(c)             Force should only be used when necessary to restore law and order, prevent violence or injury to life or limb and should always be proportional to lawful objectives.
(d)            The use of force by the police officer on election duty is a very serious matter. Any such incident must be promptly documented reported to the superior officer of the officer involved.
(e)            The PSC will investigate and take appropriate action on every incident of reported use of force by officers on election duty.

7.        Communication with Superiors and Commanders
In the event of a threat to or a breakdown of law and order during election, officers on duty must immediately report the incident to their superior or commander in accordance with standard operational procedure.

8.        Awareness of the Electoral Law
(a) Every police officer on election duty is expected to have a good working knowledge of the electoral law, especially the section on the electoral offenses, which he or she is obliged to enforce. These offenses are enumerated above under the section on electoral offences.

(b)   Unit commanders have an obligation to brief and communicate contents of the electoral law to the men and women under their supervision and command

(c)    Communication of the electoral law from the unit commanders to the officers should be in a manner and at a time close enough to the election that is most likely to capture their attention and be retained.

9.         Reporting
(a) Every police officer on election duty is obliged to file a written report at the end of his or her duty period.

(b) The report should include an account of any and every incident that required police intervention at the polling centre and any other incidents that in the judgment of the reporting officer, should be brought to the attention of his superior or authorities

(c) The report should be submitted to the Superior or Commander of the unit not later than 24 hours after completion of election duties. The superior Officer to whom these reports are handed is obliged to preserve them

(d) Omission to file or destruction of such reports will be viewed as an infraction requiring disciplinary actions.

(a)    INEC, in consultation with the IGP, shall determine and inform the PSC about operational arrangements for ensuring that electoral incidents reported by Police officers on election duty acted upon effectively and promptly.

10.      Wearing of Identification Tags
Every police officer on election duty must wear his or her name and number tags in bold print, for easy identification by voters, monitors and observers.

   11.  Cooperation and Collaboration
Police officers on election duty have a duty to co- operate and collaborate with other role players in the electoral process in order to ensure the conduct of free, fair and credible elections. They are also expected to comply with lawful instructions by the presiding and returning officer.

Printed by CLEEN Foundation with support from the Open Society Initiative For West Africa (OSIWA)

Wednesday, 16 March 2011

Public Presentation of the Results of the Police Station Visitors’ Week, 2010

Report of Results in
Nigeria
Summary

Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa. It has 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. It is located in West Africa and shares land borders with the Republic of Benin in the West, Chad and Cameroon in the East and Niger in the North.

Presention of Altus Award (3rd Best Police Station in Nigeria) to
Badagry Police Station DCO Lagos State,
by Innocent Chukwuma, ED Cleen Fundation  
Nigeria has only one formal police organization recognized by the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1990, the Nigeria Police Force.  A total of 135 (one hundred and thirty-five) police stations participated in the 2010 Altus police station visitors’ week. All the police stations that participated were drawn from Akwa Ibom, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Imo, Lagos, Oyo and Rivers States. The visits were organized by CLEEN Foundation in collaboration with other civil society organizations such as the Network on Police Reform in Nigeria (NOPRIN), the Project Alert on Violence Against Women, Women’s Rights Advancement and Protections (WRAPA), Transition Monitoring Group, Community Policing Partnership Forum, Abak, government agencies such as the Ministry of Police Affairs and the National Human Rights Commission

LR:Kemi Okenyodo, Altus Regional Rep,
DPO, Seme Police Station, Innocent Chukwuma, CLEEN Foundation,
DPO, Bodija Housing Police Station, DCO Badagry 

Four hundred and thirty-five (436) citizens of Nigeria participated in the exercise from different age groups, states, educational social status and professional backgrounds were involved in the visits.

Which police stations participated?

One hundred and thirty-five (135) police stations participated in the exercise. They are as follows:




NigeriaAkwa Ibom State Police Command

A division
Abak
B division

C division

D division
Eket

Esien udim
Etim ekpo
Etinaman

Ibesikpo asut
Ibiomo ibiom
Itu

Nsit ata
Nsit nbium
Oruk anan

Ukunafun
Urunam
Okobo

Onna




Federal capital territory police command

Abaji
Central
Kwali

Butse alahji
Gariki
Maitama

Gwagwa
Karimu
Nyanya

Karishe
Karu
Wuye

Kubuwa
Kuje
Asokoro

Lugbe
National Assembly
Wuse

Zuba
Gwagwalada
Life camp

Gwarimpa



Imo State Police Command

Aboh mbaise
Aluazu
Oguta

Ehine mbano
Iho
Orlu

Isiala mbano
Mbaitoli
Orlu west

New owerri
Ugor okpala
Owerri west

Njaba
Obowo
Ohaji

Orlu East
Owerri East
Owerri Urban

Shell lamp







Lagos State Police Command

Adeniji adele
Akinpelu
Denton

Alapere
Alausa
Ebute-ero division

Anthony
Apapa
Festac

Apata
Badagry
Idimu

Bariga
Bode thomas
Ikeja

Dolphin
Ikotun
Itire

Ejigbo
Ilasa maja
Layeni

Gowon estate
Ijora bariga
Ikoyi

Ijeshatedo
Iponri
Ilupeju

Itire
Ojo
Ipaja

Layeni
Okokomaiko
Isheri

Makinde
Pen-cinema
Ketu

Maroko
Satellite
Ikoyi

Mushin
Surulere
Ilupeju

Ketu
Trinity
Sabo

Lion building
Ogudu
Seme

Man centre
Ojodu
Tolu

Mosafejo
Onikan
Victoria





OYO STATE POLICE COMMAND

Agodi gate
Oguda
Iyana offa

Ogugu
Akobo
Mokola

Bodija
Dugbe
Ojoo

Gbagi
Housing bodija
Testing ground

Idiaro
Idi-ogun
Iyana offa

Idi-ogungun
Iyaganku
Mokola

Ogbere
Mapo
Sars

Yemetu







RIVERS STATE POLICE COMMAND

Diobu
Mini Okoro
Borokiri

Rumukpakwu
Special area
Oyibo





                                                                





Presention of Altus Award (2nd Best Police Station in Nigeria)
to Housing Bodija Police Station DPO, Oyo State by Innocent Chukwuma, ED Cleen Fundation 
Pretension of Altus Award (1st Best Police Station in Nigeria)
to Sene Police Station DPO, Lagos State by Innocent Chukwuma, ED Cleen Fundation



















Who were the visitors?

In Nigeria, the visits were conducted in Imo, Oyo, Lagos Akwa Ibom and the FCT. A total of 436 visitors participated in the exercise. Below is a breakdown of the demographics of the visitors are as follows:



















Which police station scored the highest?

Among the one hundred and thirty-three police station visited in Nigeria, these three police stations scored highest base on the assessment carried by the visitors.

1.     Seme police station 96.0% (Lagos)
2.      Bodija 93.7% (Oyo) and
3.     Badagry (Lagos) 92.3%

All the scores in each indicator areas were collated together in their different categories to form national assessment in order to ascertain the outstanding categories and those lacking. The chart below represents the national assessment of Nigeria.








Each of the five indicator areas was analyzed separately to reveal the performance of few outstanding police stations in these areas. Thus, the charts below are representations of each category.


COMMUNITY ORIENTATION
HOUSING BODIJA POLICE STATION


Community orientation, the visitors scored Housing Bodija police station 100.0% to emerge in the first position. Seme police station came second with 98.3% while Badagry came third with 96.7%.



PHYSICAL CONDITIONS ILUPEJU POLICE STATION


Physical conditions: the visitors scored Ilupeju police station 98.7% to emerge in the first position. Seme police station came second with 91.7% while Badagry came third with 83.7%.






EQUAL TREATMENT OF PUBLIC SEME POLICE


Equal treatment of public: Seme, Housing Bodija and Badagry police stations scored 100.0% to come first, followed by  Housing Ilupeju in the second place with 81.7% and finally in third place, A Division police (Akwa Ibom) with 75%.








Transparency and accountability: the visitors scored Housing Bodija police station 100.0% to emerge in the first position. Seme police station came second with 96.7% while Badagry came third with 95.0%.






Detention conditions: Seme and Housing Bodija police stations scored 93.3% as the highest in first position, Badagry came second with 86.7% and Ilupeju came third with 78.3.




















Overall Scores:  Drawing from the chart above:
 Seme scored 96.0%
 Housing Bodija 93.7% and
Badagry  92.3% .

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