Friday, 8 September 2017

Communique Issued at the Townhall Dialogue On Civil-Military Relations in Borno

PREAMBLE

The Boko Haram insurgency in North East Nigeria has led to a tremendous level of humanitarian crises that has seen people being forced to leave their homes. Lives have been lost. Livelihoods destroyed and millions of people have been forced to leave their homes for Internally Displaced Persons camps. The Nigerian Military and other security agencies, as a result of this insurgency have been forced to intervene in what looked initially like a civil issue to be handled by the Nigeria Police Force. Seven years down the line, the Military have become entrenched in the lives of the civil population. Considerable peace has been achieved over the years due to the activities of the Nigerian Armed Forces especially, the Military and the support from the public, especially the Civilian Joint Task Force (CJTF). A lot still needs to be done to totally end the insurgency while there are enormous tasks ahead with regards to post insurgency interventions. To achieve results, it has become very imperative to have a viable Civil-Military Relations in conflict-affected regions of the country. Civil-military relations have been the major strategy used during and after conflicts in different cultures of the world. It is based on this premise that the CLEEN Foundation, as part of its contribution to the security architecture in Borno State, in conjunction with Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution and the National Human Rights Commission and supported by the National Endowment for Democracy, organised a one-day Town Hall dialogue to discuss issues and challenges to robust civil military relations in the region while proffering strategies to mitigate such challenges. The Town Hall dialogue was attended by representatives of the Nigerian Armed  Forces, The Nigeria Police Force, the Nigerian Security and Civil Defence Corps, religious leaders, civil society and the media. Papers were presented on different aspects of civil military relations by resource persons with questions and comments made by participants during the dialogue. 
KEY OBSERVATIONS
Based on the papers presented and discussions  during the dialogue, the following key observations were made:
1.      The Military and all other security agencies should be commended for their efforts in ensuring the return of relative peace to Borno state and other parts of the North East.
2.      The establishment of Armed Forces broadcast organisations (Armed Forces Radio) is commendable but a lot needs to be done in the area of sensitisation of the public on the roles and responsibilities of the Military as well civilian relations with the Military.
3.      That there are still concerns and apprehension amongst the civilian population on where and how to report issues of security concerns in their communities.
4.      That there is still challenges to establishing mutual trust and understanding between Civilians and the Military, as well as other security agencies.
5.      Military personnel and other security personnel should be seen to be role models in their attitudes and behaviour.
6.      Participants commended the synergy between the various security agencies but noted that there are still areas for improvement.
7.      Participants called for greater awareness on the existence of the human rights desks in the army headquarters and at the various divisions. 
8.      Participants called for open and robust response to all allegations of human rights abuses by the military and other security agencies as this is fundamental to cordial civil military relations.
9.      There is a greater need for  citizens to report security threats to the officially approved  channels of communication to the security agencies.
10.  Professionalism and exhibition of discipline are paramount in the work of security agents.
11.  Participants also raised concerns about the propagation of extremist views and hate speeches in the Nigerian society and their implications for safety and security.
12.  Participants also raised a lot of observations on the need for peaceful co-existence in the society.
13.  The Civilian Joint Task Force was also commended for their contribution to the relative peace in Borno state and other parts of the North-East.
Based on these and many other observations, the following recommendations were made by the participants:
1.      Members of the public should continue to provide maximum support to the Military and other security agencies in their quest to end the insurgency.
2.      The National Orientation Agency and media houses should develop and air programmes to re-orientate the minds of Nigerians towards the military. They should encourage Nigerians to accord some privileges to  military personnel and other security agencies on uniform in terms of access to public services.
3.      Training and retraining programs should be carried out for all military personnel and other security agencies including the rank and file.
4.      The services and signals of the Armed Forces Radio should be extended across the country while more programmes sensitising the public on the activities of the Military and other security agencies should be produced and  aired regularly.
5.      Members of the public should report all issues of security threats to the appropriate authorities. The security agencies should also disseminate how people can access such channels of reporting.
6.      Periodic conduct of town hall meetings was also suggested between the security agencies and civilian groups like youths, women and community leaders.
7.      There should be proactive reporting of security threats by civilians which will help de-escalate any potential conflict situation.
8.      Participants also called for increased and robust synergy between the security agencies and the civilian population.
9.      Awareness campaigns on the existence of human rights desks in the army headquarters and other security agencies should be intensified.
10.  The Nigerian  Military and other security agencies should proactively respond to all allegations of human rights violations in a transparent manner.
11.  The Military and other security agencies should always display decorum, transparency, discipline and professionalism in their conduct.
12.  The meeting also called on religious leaders to ensure that extremist ideologies are not propagated while existing ones are challenged and neutralised.
13.  Hate speeches should also be discouraged by  parents, teachers, the media and religious leaders through their preaching and comments in the public.
14.  Community leaders were also called upon to preach the importance of peaceful co-existence in the society.
15.  Peace education should be enhanced across the state while  youths should be educated on the history of violent conflicts in the country.
16.  Responding to channels of reporting security issues, the following were provided:
Nigeria Army Contact
Major Galadima 08068576696, 08178726004, 08051512477
Emergency call center number: 193
Human Rigts Desk Office Numbers: 08160134303, 08161507644
Email:
na.hrd@army.mil.ng
Armed Forces Radio: Phone number: 08026007418 Email: afnradio@gmail.com

Nigeria Police Borno State Command Contact
Control room number: 08068075581, 08023473293
Public Relations Officer: 08030925924, Email:
odionsylvester2000@gmail.com
Email: bornostatecomms@gmail.com, bornostatecomms@yahoo.com

Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Borno Contact
Phone numbers: 07084284978, 08038676052

 Done in Maidugiri, Borno State, Wednesday 6th September 2017 


Tel: 07067899368, 09035200933 Website: www.cleen.org E-mail: cleen@cleen.org
Twitter: @cleenfoundation Facebook: cleenfoundation Hashtag: #CMR_NG
 

Tuesday, 29 August 2017

Call for Expression of Interest (EOI):Experienced and Qualified Data Collectors on Digitizing Courts Proceedings across selected states in Nigeria

Date of EOI: 28th August, 2017

Closing Date of the EOI: 15th September, 2017

Email EOI to: cleen@cleen.org

1. Purpose of Expression of Interest(EOI)

CLEEN Foundation seeks Expression of Interest (EOI) from qualified Civil Society Organizations and Law Firms working in the area of administration of criminal justice in Nigeria to be part of a team who will be responsible for data collection on the digitization of courts proceedings and rulings on corruption cases across selected states in Nigeria (Lagos, Anambra, Ekiti, Abuja, Kaduna, Enugu, Oyo, and Ondo states).

2. Background

Information on court proceedings and court rulings relating to corruption cases is not readily available in the public space. This is coupled with the fact that government actors are yet to embrace the culture of online record keeping. The opportunity presented by this project is that proactive disclosure of information pertaining to court proceedings on corruption will be tracked, documented and disseminated for the use of relevant stakeholders. It is also aimed at improving the efficiency, transparency and impartiality of the Judiciary and other stakeholders in processing corruption cases with respect to the administration of criminal justice system in Nigeria.


  • It is against this background that a competent and reliable state level data collection team is proposed on the CLEEN Foundation Project- “Promoting Accountability and Transparency in the Administration of Criminal Justice System in Nigeria”, for the purpose of collation and documentation of corruption cases at the state level. The team will drive the implementation of the project on the Digitization of Court Proceedings and Rulings. The uwazidocs open source application (a web/mobile-based platform) will be deployed and adapted to enable the data collectors to scan, upload, publish documents and create table of contents while end users can search, filter documents, track changes, cross reference and download documents/court rulings. The data is to be sourced from the state and Federal High Courts in the focal states on a weekly basis.
3. Objective of the Project

To make credible information on the proceedings and rulings on corruption cases available and easily accessible online to stakeholders.

4. Scope of Work
The members of the team will be responsible for the following:

  • Work with court officials and selected partners in the focal states to obtain credible data on court proceedings and rulings relating to corruption, accountability and transparency in the administration of criminal justice system in Nigeria,                                                                                               
  •  The collected data on court rulings on cases of corruption will be uploaded on the online platform.
  • Enhance judicial accountability and transparency in the criminal justice system in Nigeria in line with the provisions of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act, 2015.
5. Requirements 


All interested organizations and firms must submit the following:

1. A Cover Letter with evidence of relevant past work experience(s)  in the area of criminal justice administration;
2. Certificate of Registration in Nigeria;
3. A recent annual report/newsletter; and
4. 2 Referees conversant with the work of the organization or law firm.


6. Submission of Expression of Interest(EOI)


All submissions should be sent to cleen@cleen.org no later than close of business on Friday, 15th September, 2017.  Interested organisations in the selected states are strongly encouraged to apply.
If you have any additional questions about this Call for Expression of Interest (EOI), please email ruth.okugbeni@cleen.org No phone calls please.




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Thursday, 17 August 2017

CLEEN Releases Summary Findings from First Round of Public Perception Survey on Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria

CLEEN Foundation at the Stakeholders' Summit on the Administration of Criminal Justice in Nigeria held at Denis Hotel, Abuja on Tuesday, 9th August, 2017 presented a preliminary report from the first Round of Public Perception Survey on Criminal Justice Administration in Nigeria. The aim of the  survey  was to obtain a better understanding of the perception and assessment of the criminal justice system and the implementation of the Administration of Criminal justice (ACJ) Act, 2015.

The survey which was conducted in  Adamawa, Cross River, Imo, Kaduna, Lagos States and the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja respectively had a total of 5,099(2,669 males and 2,430 females) respondents interviewed between 6th of March 2017 and 16th of March 2017 when the survey was conducted.

The released findings show that responses were received on a number of areas which included familiarity with the criminal justice agencies; demand for services provided by the criminal justice agencies; their level of effectiveness and trend of performance; constraints affecting the agencies and criminal justice administration in Nigeria; suggested approaches to effective criminal justice administration amongst others.

Summary of findings

·         According to the findings of the survey, police(41.0%) and lawyers(25.4%) were the criminal justice agencies whose services were most sought in the previous twelve months;
·         More than 50% of the respondents in each state surveyed perceived the criminal justice and law enforcement agencies to be effective;
·         On the trend of performance, majority of the respondents across the states reported improved performance of the criminal justice agencies in the previous twelve months;
·         Lack of proper investigation and prosecution and corruption by the police were identified as prominent constraints affecting criminal justice administration in Nigeria;
·         Proactive investigation methods, training and retraining of personnel, better community collaboration, coordination and supervision of criminal justice and law enforcement personnel, adequate funding and facilities were identified as measures to enhance criminal justice administration in Nigeria


The preliminary survey report was presented to the public by Professor Etannibi Alemika of the University of Jos and Chairman of the Board of Directors of CLEEN Foundation at the Stakeholders' Summit on the Administration of Criminal Justice in Nigeria organized by CLEEN Foundation in collaboration with the Administration of Criminal Justice Monitoring Committee (ACJMC) as part of activities under its  project on Monitoring the Criminal Justice Administration Reform Process in Nigeria The project is aimed at strengthening the implementation of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act in Nigeria through the systematic monitoring of key agencies and advocacy to ensure the agencies fulfill their new roles under the Act.

……………..
For further details and complete report:

www.cleen.org or http://cleenfoundation.blogspot.com

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Public Perception Of Criminal Justice In Nigeria: Preliminary Report

Project: Monitoring the Criminal Justice Administration reform process in Nigeria


A component of the project is to conduct two perception surveys on the effectiveness of administration of justice in Nigeria.

This first round of public perception survey on Administration of Criminal Justice in Nigeria was conducted in February 2017 by CLEEN Foundation in collaboration with Practical Sampling International (PSI). The purpose of the survey is to:
·       To assess the ACJA effectiveness and strengthen its implementation
·        Provide reliable and credible data and information for the public on the administration of criminal justice in Nigeria.

The aim of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the perception and assessment of the criminal justice system and the Implementation of the Administration of the Criminal Justice Act (ACJA).

Data collection
The survey consisted of 5099 respondents drawn from five states and Abuja (Federal Capital Territory, treated as a State in North Central for this Survey). The survey was conducted Abuja and Adamawa, Cross River, Imo, Kaduna and Lagos States. The sample consists of two sub-samples: respondents drawn from the public and special professional group comprising police, lawyers, judicial staff etc.
The basic methodology employed for data collection was in-home, face-to-face personal interview using a modified, multi-stage random selection procedure to achieve a representative sample.

The Questionnaire was in CAPI format in which Tablet- Devices were used to elicit information on the project. Respondents in the sub-sample drawn from the public were males and females aged eighteen years and older, who had stayed in the selected household for a period of not less than six months. Non-citizens of Nigeria and people living in institutionalized settings were not part of the respondents.

Sub-sample comprising professionals consists of Lawyers, Registrars, Police, Judges/Magistrate, Civil Servant (MOJ), Office of Directorate of Public Prosecutions.
There were 2669 males and 2430 females in the sample. The sub-sample comprising professionals had 420 males and females. The public sub-sample comprise 2,249 males and 2,240 females, almost an equal representation.

The fieldwork commenced in Lagos, Abuja, Kaduna, Imo, and Cross River State on the 6th of March 2107 Only Adamawa started on 7th of March 2017 due to Logistic. Fieldwork and quality control activities on this project end across the study on the 16th of March 2017.  Therefore, Fieldwork for the project lasted for 11 days including weekends i.e. from 6th of March 2017 to 16th of March 2017.

Sampling Procedure
Respondents’ selection followed a clustered, stratified, multi stage random selection process thus:
  • Stratify and random selection of Sector
  • Random selection of sampling start points
  • Random selection of households
  • Selection of eligible respondents.

Samples were drawn from the following Local Government Areas of the States
§         Abuja: Abuja Municipal, Bwari
§         Adamawa: Yola North and Yola South
§         Kaduna: Chikun, Kaduna North and Kaduna South
§         Imo: Owerri-Municipal, Owerri North and Owerri West
§         Cross River: Odukpani, Calabar South and Calabar Municipality
§         Lagos: Alimosho, Ajeromi-Ifelodun, Kosofe, Mushin, Oshodi-Isolo, Surulere, Agege, Ifako-Ijaye, Shomolu. Amuwo-Odofin, Ikeja, and Lagos Island        

Sample size = 5099
Abuja – 764
Adamawa – 714
Kaduna – 1239
Imo – 643
Cross River – 770
Lagos - 969

Field work by Practical Sampling International (PSI) Lagos

ANALYSIS
Familiarity with the police, courts and prisons in Nigeria

Familiarity with police
A little more than one-fifth (21.9%) of the respondent were very familiar with the police; 47.2% were familiar with the police; 16.8% were somewhat familiar and 13.9% were not familiar. More than two-third (69.1%) were either very familiar of familiar with the police.

There were variations in the extent of familiarity with the police by respondents in the six states. Those who responded being very familiar and familiar with the police across the states were 73.8% (Abuja, FCT); Adamawa (70.6%); Kaduna (74.8%); Imo (78.7%); Cross River (57.2%) and Lagos (60.3%). Familiarity of citizens with the police was highest in Imo State and lowest in Lagos State. 

Familiarity with the Courts
More than one-half (55.3%) of the respondents were either very familiar (15.4%) and familiar (39.9%) with the courts. Less than a fifth (18.9%) of the respondents were somewhat familiar with the courts and 25.0% were not familiar with the judicial agency. Extent of familiarity with the courts vary across the states covered by the study. Those who were either very familiar or familiar with courts in the states were 60.4% (Abuja FCT); 57.8% (Adamawa); 62.2% (Kaduna); 71.2% (Imo); 41.5% (Cross River) and 41.6% (Lagos State).

Familiarity with prisons
Less than a half (48.7%) of the respondents from the six states were either very familiar (12.6%) or familiar (34.2) with the prisons in the country. In contrast, 22.0% were somewhat familiar and 24.9% were not familiar. Extent of familiarity (very familiar/familiar) in the states were 52.0% (Abuja, FCT); 50.5% (Adamawa); 56.0% (Kaduna); 63.2% (Imo); 35.8% (Cross River) and 36.2% (Lagos). Significantly, 44.3% of the respondents in Cross River State and 47.9% in Lagos State said they were not familiar with the prisons.




As expected, citizens were most familiar with the police which is the gatekeeping agency in the criminal justice system. Surprisingly, respondents in Lagos State, the most urbanized state in the country, consistently exhibited lowest familiarity with the three criminal justice agencies.

More than two-fifths (41.0%) of the respondents demanded for the services of the police in the previous twelve months and a quarter (25.4%) demanded for the services of lawyers. More than one-fifth demanded for the services of the courts. The high level of demand for services of criminal justice agencies may be partly explained by the existence a sub-sample of legal practitioners and law enforcement agencies.

Services of the criminal justice agencies were utilized more by respondents in Imo and Lagos states and Abuja (Federal Capital Territory).

Effectiveness of criminal justice and law enforcement agencies
Criminal justice agencies were generally considered effective by more than a half of the respondents in each state covered by the study. The only exception was in Abuja where 38.0% considered the prison effective (table 3)

Trend of performance of criminal justice and law enforcement agencies over past year
Majority of the respondents across the states reported improvement in the performance of the criminal justice agencies over the past year. Respondents in Imo and Lagos States reported the highest and lowest levels of improvement of performance by criminal justice, judicial and law enforcement agencies (table 4)

Most important constraint affecting criminal justice administration in Nigeria
Respondents across the states reported that lack of proper investigation and prosecution as well as corruption by the police were the two most important constraints affecting criminal justice administration in the country. Several other constraints were identified by the respondents (table 5).

Police behaviour and rule of law
Majority of respondents did not think that police always or often act according to law, respect the rights of citizens and receive punishment for violating the law. More than two-fifths, however, reported that they sometimes act according to the law and respect the rights of citizens, and assist citizens in distress (table 6).




Effectiveness of police in investigation, arrest and prosecution
More than a half of the respondents said police were very effective or effective in timely and thorough investigation of crimes apprehension and prosecution of perpetrators of crime (table 7)

Perceptions of police actions and rule of law
Less than a third of the respondents across the states believed police always or often act according to law, respect the rights of citizens and receive punishment for violation of law (table 8).

Perception of effectiveness of the police across states
Respondents in Adamawa, Imo and Cross Rivers States rated effectiveness of the police in timely and thorough criminal investigation as well as apprehension and prosecution of perpetrators of crime. In contrast, respondents in Lagos were more critical of the effectiveness of the police in performing these tasks (table 9).

Corruption was consistently identified as the critical constraints affecting police carrying out timely investigation. This view was held more by respondents Imo and Adamawa states. Other major constraints identified were incompetence and inadequate funding (table 10).

Critical factors affecting police carrying out thorough investigation
Corruption and incompetence were the two factors identified by respondents across the states as critical constraints affecting thorough investigation by police (table 11).

Critical constraints affecting apprehension and prosecution of offenders
Most important constraints affecting effective apprehension and just prosecution of offenders consistently identified by respondents across the states were corruption, inadequate funding and incompetence (table 12).

Measures for improving apprehension and prosecution of offenders by police
Four measures recommended by greater proportion of respondents across the states for improving apprehension of offenders were proactive investigation method, working closely with communities and collaboration with other security agencies and retraining of personnel. Three major measures recommended for improved prosecution of offenders were adoption of proactive investigation method, working closely with communities and use of scientific and technology aid to investigation (table 13).




Effectiveness of courts in charging suspects and fair administration of justice
Majority of respondents in the states, apart from Abuja, reported that magistrate courts were effective in charging suspects brought before them. The courts were particularly rated very highly by respondents in Imo (72.5%) and Kaduna (67.7%). Asked about the effectiveness of courts in ensuring fair administration of criminal justice, more than a half of the respondents across the states said the courts were effective. More than 70% of the respondents in Imo (75,0%) and Adamawa (70.1%) said the courts were effective in fair administration of criminal process. (table 14).  
  
Usefulness of jail delivery visits to prisons by Chief Judges
A measure designed to ensure that remanded inmates are not unduly detained, and prevent prison overcrowding associated with awaiting trail inmates is visit to prisons by Chief Judges of States. Respondents were asked if such visits are useful and serve the intended purposes. Majority of the respondents believed it was not much or very much useful. However, more than two-fifths (43.1%) of respondents in Adamawa were of the view that such visits were much or very much useful (table 15).

Approaches to effective criminal justice administration
Respondents were asked about measures or approaches to enhance effective criminal adjudication in Nigeria. Measures that were frequently measured by respondents across the states were greater discipline and supervision of judges and lawyers, adequate funding, better training of judges and adequate facilities and equipment (table 16).

Trend of prison break in Nigeria
Prison break was reported to have increased in Imo State by more than two-thirds (43.7%) while respondents in other states reported less increase, for example, Lagos (23.9%) and Adamawa (22.4%) (table 17).
Several incidences of prison break were reported in the country over the past decades. During such jail-break, violent and dangerous criminals, including suspects of terrorism, kidnapping and robbery were released. Respondents were asked what they think were the most important causes of prison breaks in the country.  Most frequently identified causes across the states were lack of proper management and oversight of prisons (24.7%); overcrowding and congestion (23.6%) and lack of basic amenities due to inadequate funding (22.7%) (table 18).




Adequacy of services and facilities in Nigerian Prisons
Inadequacy of services and facilities in Nigeria were often reported by officials, government, inmates, human rights advocates. Facilities such as health care, feeding, clothing, recreational facilities and vocational training were generally regarded as grossly lacking. Respondents were asked about adequacy of facilities in Nigerian prisons. Less than half said facilities and services were very adequate of adequate. While respond dents in Adamawa (48.8%); Cross River (46.4%) and Kaduna (44.2%) said the facilities and services were adequate or very adequate, fewer respondents in Abuja (22.3%) and Abuja (28.6%) described the services as adequate or very adequate (table 19).
Best approach to increasing effectiveness for correctional system in Nigeria
Respondents were asked what approaches will increase effectiveness of correctional system in the country. Most frequently identified measures were adequate funding (24.6%); better training of officials (20.1%); better welfare of prisons officials; adequate facilities and equipment (11.8%) and better monitoring and oversight of prisons (table 20).
More than two-thirds of the respondents in each of the states identified the following factors (table 20) as the critical problems of criminal justice administrations in the states where they lived:
a.      Lack of pro-active investigation
b.      Defective mechanisms for obtaining evidence
c.      Inadequate witness protection
d.      Incompetence of investigators
e.      Corrupt police investigators and prosecutors
f.      Lack of prosecutorial independence
g.      Non-adherence to due process and suspects’ rights
h.      Lack of witness support
i.        Inadequate modern equipment
j.       Inadequate facilities




Critical problems of courts in respondents’ state of residence
Respondents were asked about the critical problems affecting the effectiveness of courts in their states of residence. They identified several factors (table 21) as follows:
a.      Excessive pre-trial detention
b.      Delay of cases
c.      Lack of effective monitoring of case status
d.      Poor facilities
e.      Poor judicial decisions
f.      Inadequate resources
g.      Inadequate criminal defence
h.      Inadequate legal aid assistance
i.        Corruption of judges and lawyers
j.       Lack of impartiality amongst judges
k.      Lack of judicial independence
At least a half of the respondents in each of the states identified these problems as critical or very critical (table 21).

Critical problems of the prisons in respondents’ state of residence
Respondents were asked about the critical problems confronting prisons in their states of residence. They identified several factors (table 22) as follows:
a.      Inadequate resources
b.      Poor facilities
c.      0vercrowing and congestion
d.      Delay in presentation of suspects in court for trial
e.      Lack of proper documentation of awaiting trial inmates 
f.      Incompetent prions officials
g.      Corruption of prison officials
h.      Lack of proper management and oversight of prisons
i.        Poor welfare of inmates
j.       Poor condition of service for prison officials
No less than one-half of respondents in each state identified these factors as critical or very critical (table 22).



Assessment of performance of office of State DPP
Office of the DPP at the federal and state levels play critical roles in the prosecution of serious cases, especially in higher courts. Prosecutors in the offices vet case files; offer legal advice on whether to prosecute cases, and undertake prosecutions when required. Respondents were asked about the performance of the DPP in the state. Their performance was rated highly in Imo (73.1) and Adamawa (71.2%) while rated as such by 43.8% in Abuja, the only state where less than 50% rated the performance of the offices as good or very good (table 23).

Reasons for delay in issuance of legal advice by DPPs
In serious cases, there were allegations of delay in rendering legal advice to the police and other law enforcement agencies by the offices of the DPP. Respondents were asked what they considered to be reasons for such delays. Several reasons were offered (table ) as follow:
a.      Delay in transfer of case files by CID
b.      Lack of effective coordination between CID and DPP office
c.      Delays caused by bureaucratic bottlenecks with DPP office
d.      Poor investigation by police

Effects of delay in issuance of legal advice by DPPs
Delay in issuance of legal advice by DPPs impacts on suspects, victims and law enforcement agencies who require them to further process a case. Respondents were asked of the effects of delay in rendering advice on whether to prosecute. They identify the following factors (table 25):
a.      Long pre-trial detention
b.      Violation of suspects’ human rights
c.      Prison overcrowding and congestion
d.      Delayed trial
Violation of human rights was the most cited effect of delay in providing legal advice for prosecution by the offices of DPP








ASSESSMENT OF ACJA

Sample size = 5099
Belong to any of the criminal justice agencies?
% Yes, across sample = 8.6% (439)
Abuja (9.3); Adamawa (10.8%); Kaduna (6.9%); Imo (10.0%); Cross River (8.7) and Lagos (8.6%)

Heard of ACJA?
18.1% of the entire sample
- Abuja (24.6%); Adamawa (19.5%); Kaduna (16.3%); Imo (17.1%); Cross River (18.1%) and Lagos (15.2%)

Familiarity with ACJA
Among the respondents who said they heard about ACJA, 40.3% were familiar with it and 25.7 were very familiar with it. Overall, two-thirds of those who heard about ACJA were familiar with it

Level of familiarity with the law among those who have heard about it was generally high. Comparing the level of familiarity at the state level, those who responded that they were familiar/very familiar were as follow: Abuja (76.4); Adamawa (55.4%); Kaduna (74.8%); Imo (65.4%); Cross River (64.0%) and Lagos (66.0%).

Knowledge of implementation of ACJA
 More than two-thirds (68.0%) of the respondents who said they heard about ACJA reported that they knew that it was being implemented.

Those who reported awareness of the implementation of the law in the states where the study was conducted were Abuja (71.7%); Adamawa (68.5%); Kaduna (73.6%); Imo (45.75); Cross River (71.1%) and Lagos (68.0%)

Satisfaction with the implementation of ACJA
Respondents were satisfied with the implementation of the law. Among the respondents who reported hearing about the law, 86.0% were satisfied {28.3% very satisfied and 58.7% satisfied) with its implementation. Level of satisfaction by respondents across the states were Abuja (82.3%); Adamawa (77.9); Kaduna (92.3%); Imo (93.4%); Cross River (84.8%) and Lagos (94.0%).


Inauguration of the CSO Observatory on ACJA


View of respondents on whether ACJA will improve criminal justice administration
Most of the respondents (93.1%) across the states said the law will improve criminal justice administration system in Nigeria. Respondents in the states were also optimistic that the administration of criminal justice in the country will be improved by the implementation of ACJA as follows: Abuja (96.8%); Adamawa (93.0%); Kaduna (94.7%); Imo (88.9%); Cross River (88.2) and Lagos (92.8%).

Knowledge of existence of ACJA in state where respondents lived
Only a minority (20.6%) of the 5099 respondents in the sample knew of the existence of administration of criminal justice laws in their state of residence. Proportion of respondents in the states who were aware of existence of any such laws in their states where they were living was Abuja (26.35); Adamawa (20.9%); Kaduna (19.2%); Imo (17.1%); Cross River (21.0%) and Lagos (19.8%).

Satisfaction with the implementation of ACJA in state where respondents resided

More than two-thirds (70.8%) of the respondents were satisfied with the implementation of administration of criminal justice laws in their state of residence. Respondents in the different states were also generally satisfied as follows: Abuja (62.8%), Adamawa (67.9%); Kaduna (80.4%); Imo (71.5%); Cross River (64.1%) and Lagos (75.8%).

You can watch the videos




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Link to Inauguration of the CSO Observatory on ACJA Pics
https://www.facebook.com/cleenfoundationn/media_set?set=a.1378525885558700.1073741891.100002039067344&type=3


Download Podcast Audio of  Stakeholders Summit on the Administration of Criminal Justice in Nigeria -  http://www.hulkshare.com/iot1tx4x4q2o

Link to #ACJA_NG Stakeholders Summit Pictures
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